4-H Youth Development Program
4-H Youth Development Program
4-H Youth Development Program
University of California
4-H Youth Development Program

Chapter 7: Experiential Learning

Chapter 7

Policy Homepage | Forms & Support Documents

I. GENERAL PRINCIPLE

  1. Project-Based Learning 
    Members participate in subject-matter projects over an extended period of time where they are guided through experiences, reflect and then apply their learning. In this manner, youth explore, practice and master skills that promote youth development and educational outcomes. Projects and related curriculum provide the basic foundation for 4-H YDP learning experiences. Projects provide cooperative and collaborative learning opportunities, which help youth develop teamwork skills and promote deeper learning through group reflection. Project leaders guide the learning process through posing challenges, setting boundaries, supporting youth, facilitating and guided reflection. 
  2. Experiential Learning Model
    The California 4-H Youth Development Program (4-H YDP) utilizes a 5-step experiential learning model (experience-share-process-generalize-apply) to promote members' sense of belonging, competence and agency. Utilizing the experiential learning model helps young people develop deeper understanding of subject matter, practice skills and gain practical wisdom through authentic experiences, guided reflection and application in new situations. See http://www.experientiallearning.ucdavis.edu/default.shtml
  3. Application of Knowledge
    The 4-H YDP emphasis is on the practical application of learning or “learning by doing” to develop skills and acquire a sense of responsibility, initiative, identity and self-worth. Youth learn through participation in authentic activities where they have personalized experiences, and are able to raise questions and seek answers important to themselves, their families, peers and their community.
  4. Research-Based Programs
    Effective youth development programs are based on basic and applied research. Developing programs for youth that will produce positive outcomes requires appropriate program design and planning, implementation and evaluation.
    1. 4-H YD programs must also be attractive to youth, so that they will voluntarily participate. It is important that these experiences are anchored in positive relationships with a caring adult and provide a safe environment where youth are engaged, involved in their communities and develop and demonstrate their new skills. 
    2. 4-H YDP members belong to organized 4-H units including clubs, special interest/short-term programs, school enrichment programs, overnight camping programs, individual study/mentoring/family learning programs, and school-age childcare or after-school education programs. Appropriate methods and curricula must be integrated into these deliveries to further the educational objectives of the 4-H YDP. See Chapter 4: Enrollment and Delivery Mode for definitions.

II. EVALUATION

  1. Program Evaluation
    4-H YDP advisors, academic coordinators and specialists at the county and state level are responsible for evaluating the effectiveness of each delivery method used in the 4-H YDP at their respective level.
  2. Program, Project and Activity Planning
    Programs, activities and events are evaluated by the Project_and_Activity_Evaluation_Checklist. Delivery methods and curricula that do not meet the evaluation criteria or are not compatible with the 4-H YDP Mission and Direction Program_Criteria_Checklist must be modified or discontinued.

III. STATEWIDE 4-H YDP CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

  1. Curriculum Content
    At the center of the 4-H YDP is high quality learning experiences fueled by age appropriate, learner-centered subject-matter content. Content can be in the broad areas of positive youth development as well as specific subject matter associated with project learning. See 4-H Curricula
  2. Curriculum Development
    Any subject matter expert within the UC community may propose statewide curricula. Prospective developers should check with the 4-H YDP curriculum committee for potential funding and support. The proposed curriculum must meet the needs outlined by the curriculum committee or subcommittee in the appropriate project category. Curricula must also be educationally sound and appropriate for the developmental levels of the intended audience. New curricula should be field-tested.  Curriculum may be submitted to UC ANR for peer review and/or publishing. See ANR Peer Review and Publishing.
  3. National 4-H Curriculum
    The National 4-H Curriculum is a national database of reviewed and suggested 4-H materials available for use by 4-H YDP staff, members and adult volunteers.
  4. Developmental Appropriateness of Project Curriculum
    All 4-H YDP curricula must be developmentally appropriate for participants and appropriate for the delivery mode. 4-H YDP staff has the responsibility for approving and evaluating all curricula for local, county and state use.

IV. FAIRS, EXPOSITIONS AND OTHER SPONSORED SHOWS

  1. Purpose
    Fairs provide opportunities for members to exhibit the best of their project work from the past year and see how their skills have grown. Fairs also share with the community what 4-H YDP activities are taking place in their area. Each fair is governed by a set of rules that should be carefully reviewed by 4-H YDP staff.
  2. Value of Participation
    The 4-H YDP recognizes the value of participation at fairs as a means to showcase, exhibit, and otherwise demonstrate an individual member’s accomplishments and skill development. Fair participation, however, is not a requirement for 4-H involvement, nor should fairs be considered as a validation of the learning experience.
  3. Eligibility to Show
    4-H members must complete project completion requirements and additional requirements as determined by the county 4-H YDP. Notification of county 4-H YDP requirements must be given to the member at the time of enrollment. Exhibiting at the state fair, county fairs or other exhibition events may have certain entrance requirements separate from the 4-H YDP. See Steps to Success in 4-H and Steps to Success in 4-H FAQ
  4. Ages to Show
    4-H YDP age requirements as set forth in this Handbook are to be used for determining age requirements for fair participation. The levels of membership for 4-H are age based. Each level is defined as follows:
    1. Primary Level: Must be five (5) years old by December 31st of the current program year to exhibit at fair. Primary membership ends when members qualify as junior members. Exhibitors who are under nine (9) years of age by December 31st of the current program year are not eligible to compete at California fairs. See also Primary_Member-Adult_Volunteer_Guide, Primary_Member-Fact_Sheet and Primary_Member Incentives and Recognition - FAQ.
    2. Junior, Intermediate, & Senior Level: Must be nine (9) years old by December 31st of the current program year. Exhibitors are eligible to compete/exhibit through December 31st of the year in which they turn 19 years of age.
  5. Animal Ownership
    To show or exhibit an animal project at an endorsed fair, exposition, sponsored shows (e.g., 4-H shows) or other sponsored events, it must be owned and supervised for the number of days outlined below.
    1. Poultry – must be owned and supervised for not less than 30 consecutive days and be enrolled in the project for not less than 60 consecutive days.
    2. Rabbits – must be owned and supervised for not less than 30 consecutive days and be enrolled in the project for not less than 60 consecutive days.
    3. Feeder and breeding animals – must be owned and supervised for not less than 30 consecutive days and be enrolled in the project for not less than 60 consecutive days.
    4. Market sheep, swine, veal and goats – must be owned and supervised for not less than 60 consecutive days.
    5. Market beef – must be owned and supervised for not less than 120 consecutive days.
    6. Horses – must be owned/leased and supervised for not less than 120 consecutive days. Male foals may be shown by 4-H members, but yearling and older stallions are ineligible as 4-H projects. The age of the horse shall be computed on the basis of a calendar year starting on January 1 of the year foaled; it is a weanling during the calendar year in which foaled, and a yearling during the first calendar year following its foaling date, regardless of year foaled.
    7. Llamas & Alpacas - must be owned/leased and supervised for not less than 120 consecutive days. 
  6. 4-H Project Transfers
    4-H, FFA and Grange members may transfer projects between organizations once in a calendar year. Transfers must take place not less than sixty (60) days (or the number of days required for the ownership and supervision of respective species - whichever is greater) prior to the exhibit or award recognition of the project. Transfers between organizations should be documented using Livestock_Project_Transfer_Form
  7. 4-H Sponsored Fairs
    1. Local exhibit, display and experiential opportunities may be organized, managed and offered by the 4-H YDP at the local, area or county level with the approval of county 4-H YDP staff or at the state level with the approval of state 4-H YDP staff.
    2. Adult volunteers secure a location, determine rules for entries, exhibits and awards, handle finances and actively manage all aspects of the event. See Chapter 6, VI. C. Limitation of the Authority of Volunteers.
  8. Fairs Sponsored by the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA)
    1. State, district and county fairs that receive financial support from the State of California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) Division of Fairs and Expositions provide exhibit opportunities for members. The Division of Fairs and Expositions State Rules Committee annually reviews statewide rules for entries, exhibits and awards for competitive exhibits (see State Rules for California Fairs for more information). 4-H YDP staff representatives on this committee have input regarding rules, and advise the committee about current statewide 4-H YDP policies and program activities.
    2. Additionally, individual fairs may create local rules. They may be stricter than state rules, but not conflict with them. Fairs determine exhibit opportunities, including 4-H classes. If members choose to participate in a fair, they must follow the fair rules.
    3. A memorandum of understanding (MOU)4-H_FFA_Grange_CDFA_Agreement describes the statewide cooperation between these organizations and policies governing ownership/entrepreneurial projects and enrollment of youth who participate in fairs and expositions as members of these organizations or as independent exhibitors. 
  9. Fairs Sponsored by Other Organizations
    1. Members on a local, area or county level may be invited to participate in fairs sponsored by organizations other than the CDFA Division of Fairs and Expositions. Participants must follow rules established by the sponsoring organization.
    2. Fairs may be jointly organized, involving one or more collaborators. Participation and involvement should be guided by the development of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the collaborating partners. See Chapter 12, Collaborations and Relationships for programmatic questions, and/or refer to Administrative Policies and Business Contracts for procedural questions.
  10. Primary Members and Fairs and Shows
    1. The significant difference between a primary member activity and a 4-H project is that a primary member engages in varied activities which focus on developing a specific skill or concept utilized in completing the activity rather than focusing on a long-term planned course of study in a specific project (subject) area. See Kindergarten - 3rd Grade Programs in 4-H Fact Sheet.
    2. Primary age members benefit from a variety of short-term exploratory project experiences. Primary members should not have ongoing projects of any kind including animal projects - nor should they participate as competitive exhibitors with animals - large or small, because within the 4-H program, exhibits are intended to showcase the culmination of a long-term project.
    3. In general, the handling of animals (large or small) requires discipline and motor skills that have yet to be fully developed in most children aged 5 to 8 years and when coupled with the unpredictable behavior of animals, does not provide the optimal safe educational environment.
    4. Primary members may exhibit or showcase in a noncompetitive event or  feature items from their activities. However, primary members are not eligible to receive premium funds as a result of exhibition.
    5. 4-H primary members may only receive participation ribbons. See Primary_Member Incentives and Recognition - FAQ.
  11. Primary Member Showmanship Classes
    1. Primary members may not participate in any competitive showmanship classes. This includes competitive classes also identified as “pee wee” showmanship or “junior buckaroo” events. Additionally, primary members may not participate in any type of round-robin showmanship activity which includes the handling of another youth’s animal.
    2. Should a fair offer any of these activities, primary members cannot participate as 4-H YDP members, cannot wear a 4-H uniform or other representation of 4-H, nor will their participation be recognized as a 4-H experience. See Primary_Member-Fact_Sheet and Primary_Member Incentives and Recognition - FAQ.
    3. Coverage under the 4-H accident/illness insurance program and protection under UC’s liability program will not be extended to include competitve showmanship classes.

V. JUNIOR LIVESTOCK AUCTIONS

Junior livestock auctions sponsored by 4-H Volunteer Management Organizations (VMOs; e.g., councils) or units are not permissible under ANR's financial and risk management policies.

VI. JACKPOT/PROSPECT SHOWS

  1. Introduction
    4-H YDP recognizes that there are many animal exhibition opportunities in which young people can show their project animals. Jackpot and prospect shows are one such opportunity. However, the ownership and project participation entry requirements of jackpot/prospect shows and the handling of premium funds are not consistent with UC and 4-H YDP policies and practices. The 4-H YDP places an emphasis on learning and practicing animal project lessons and this emphasis forms the basis for 4-H YDP projects and educational goals.
  2. Definition
    A jackpot/prospect show is defined as one in which entry fees are charged and cash prizes or premiums are awarded from the accumulated entry fees or other matching funds. See Jackpot-Prospect Show FAQ
  3. Participation
    1. Members cannot participate in jackpot/prospect shows as 4-H YDP members, although they may participate as individuals. Members cannot wear a 4-H uniform or other representation of 4-H, nor will their participation be recognized as a 4-H experience.
    2. Coverage under the 4-H accident/illness insurance program and protection under UC’s liability program will not be extended to include jackpot/prospect shows.
  4. Promotion
    1. Any 4-H YDP announcements regarding a jackpot/prospect show must clearly state that 4-H YDP is not sponsoring the event and is not responsible for any of the activities or outcomes associated with the show. 4-H YDP newsletter articles should not contain references to entrance fees or monetary prizes.
    2. The following disclaimer should be included with the article:
      “This article is provided for informational purposes only. No endorsement of the named jackpot/prospect show is intended, nor is criticism implied of similar shows not mentioned.”

VII. RODEO AND GYMKHANA EVENTS

  1. Determination
    4-H YDP staff should use the Project_and_Activity_Evaluation_Checklist to determine if rodeo and gymkhana events and activities meet the 4-H YDP educational criteria.
  2. Competition Between a Person and Animal
    Any activity that constitutes competition between a person and an animal is prohibited in the 4-H YDP.

VIII. CITIZENSHIP PROGRAMS

  1. Purpose
    4-H YDP places an emphasis on the importance of young people being engaged, well-informed citizens. By connecting to their communities and leaders, youth understand their role in civic affairs and are able to expand their role in decision-making processes. It is clear that civic engagement provides the foundation that helps youth understand the big picture of life and learn the skill sets that will allow them to become wise leaders for the 21st century. The 4-H YDP provides a variety of projects, events, conferences, and study programs to further young people’s learning and involvement.
  2. Citizenship Study/Travel Programs
    Study/travel programs provide a hands-on experience that promotes teen members appreciation and understanding of civic responsibility and civic engagement. Full participation requires the following:
    1. Attendance at an orientation program.
    2. Participation in all of the workshops and sessions.
    3. Participation in a plan of action to address an issue in the local community and submission of a report to the State 4-H office.
    4. Chaperones must be an adult volunteer at least 21 years of age with authorization from the county 4-H YDP staff.
    5. 4-H YDP staff must ensure that the study/travel opportunities are widely advertised and made available to all eligible 4-H members across all delivery modes. Only members and adult volunteers in good standing, as determined by county 4-H YDP, may be selected to participate in these programs.
    6. Programs should be developed with the idea of keeping costs within an affordable range so that as many members as possible can participate. Where feasible, scholarships should be made available to broaden participation.
  3. Citizenship California Focus
    The California Focus is a state conference that provides participants the opportunity to study the historic, economic, cultural and political aspects of California. County delegations are required to carryout a service learning project to address a local issue in their community that is preapproved by the State 4-H Office. Delegations must file a report with their county office and the State 4-H Office within a year after the conference. Youth are also expected to report on their trips to local groups and to promote citizenship within county programs. California Focus members delegates must be 14 years of age by the first day of the conference.
  4. Leadership Washington Focus
    Leadership Washington Focus is a 4-H leadership program. Participants build confidence in their ability to motivate and direct others in meaningful action; practice effective communications with others through group discussion and public speaking; work with others to create and accomplish goals; develop an understanding of their own personal leadership style; exchange ideas, practice respect, and form friendships with other 4-H'ers from across the nation. Participants experience hands-on learning using the historical backdrop of Washington, D.C. Leadership Washington Focus is coordinated through the State 4-H Office. Leadership Washington Focus member participants must be entering grades 7-9. 
  5. Citizenship Washington Focus
    The Citizenship Washington Focus study/travel programs provide an opportunity for members and adult volunteers to attend the Citizenship Washington Focus Program at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center near Washington, D.C. Participants attend workshops, field trips and working sessions that offer an introduction to the nation’s Capitol and the federal government. County 4-H YDP delegations are required to carryout a service project to address a local issue in their own community that is preapproved by the State 4-H Office. Delegations must file a report with their county office and the State 4-H YDP office by December 31st of the year that they travel. Members are also expected to report on their trips to local groups and to promote citizenship within county programs. Citizenship Washington Focus is coordinated through the State 4-H Office. Citizenship Washington Focus member delegates must be 15 years of age by the departure date of the trip. 
  6. Service Learning
    1. Service learning is a method through which citizenship, knowledge, skills and values are taught. It involves active learning – drawing lessons from the experience of performing service work. There are three basic components to effective service-learning:
      1. Planning – this includes researching the issue, setting objectives for learning and service and creating a plan for action that contributes to learning and service.
      2. Performing service – this includes doing what was planned that includes both learning and service.
      3. Analyzing results – this includes reviewing the experience and drawing lessons, through such means as discussion with others and reflection on the work.
    2. 4-H YDP supports a variety of Service Learning Projects opportunities for members and adult volunteers. 

IX. 4-H YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM EXCHANGES

  1. Purpose
    4-H YDP exchanges promote understanding of diverse people and help members and adult volunteers learn to live in a global society. Exchanges may involve other counties, states or nations and can exist in many forms.
  2. Domestic Exchanges
    1. For domestic exchanges going into or out of California, the California 4-H YDP Code of Conduct is in effect at all times throughout the exchange.
    2. All domestic exchanges into or out of California must be approved by the county director and/or designee.
    3. For all domestic exchanges, members must be at least 12 years of age by the time of travel to participate in exchanges.
    4. For all domestic exchanges out of California to another state, all adults in the hosting household must be an appointed 4-H adult volunteer and undergo a background check as prescribed by the 4-H YDP policy of that state. Exchanges into and out of states with inadequate background check processes (as determined by the State 4-H Office) are prohibited.
    5. For domestic exchanges into California, or for exchanges between California counties, all individuals in the hosting household 18 years of age or older must be appointed 4-H adult volunteers. The host sibling (at least one if there are multiple siblings) must be a member in good standing.
  3. International Exchanges
    1. 4-H members may participate in exchanges with Canada and U.S. territories and through organized programs led by a state 4-H Youth Development Program.
    2. For international exchanges going into or out of California, the California 4-H Member Code of Conduct is in effect at all times throughout the exchange.
    3. All international exchanges into or out of the US must be approved by the county director and/or designee, as well as the Associate Director of 4-H Program or Policy and/or designee.
    4. Members must be at least 14 years of age by the time of travel to participate in international exchanges. 
    5. For international exchanges out of California to another country, all adults in the hosting household must be appointed 4-H adult volunteers and undergo a background check as prescribed by the California 4-H YDP. Exchanges into and out of countries with inadequate background check processes (as determined by the California State 4-H Office) are prohibited.
    6. For international exchanges into California, all individuals in the hosting household 18 years of age or older must be appointed 4-H adult volunteers. The host sibling (at least one if there are multiple siblings) must be a 4-H member in good standing.

X. 4-H YOUTH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM CONFERENCES

  1. Purpose
    Conferences, symposia and workshops are held for 4-H members and adult volunteers to discuss and review programs, and issues of current and critical importance. They provide a means to disseminate research information and allow members and adult volunteers to discuss decisions of importance to statewide and county programs.
  2. Youth Leadership Conferences
    Provide members the opportunity to attend workshops on topics such as leadership, public speaking, citizenship, character building and more.
  3. State Leadership Conference
    The California 4-H YDP State Leadership Conference brings together high school youth from across California in a four-day leadership training, networking and learning experience. The conference provides the advanced leadership training and is an opportunity for 4-H members to network and share ideas with other 4-Hers from across the state. The conference focuses on providing high school youth with experiential education on leadership development, civic engagement, college admissions and other 4-H project areas. Youth delegates gain exposure to the campus by living in the residence halls, eating in the dining commons and participating in educational sessions, many of which are taught by UC faculty and staff. The conference is planned by a team of high school 4-H members and adult advisors. Working in strong youth-adult partnership, the team designs the educational, recreational and logistical components of the conference. This conference is available to youth ages 13-19. Youth must be 13 years of age by the first day of the conference. 
  4. National 4-H Conference  
    Selected senior members (at least 14 years old as of December 31st of the program year) and one selected 4-H YDP staff who acts as a chaperone attend National 4-H Conference held at the National 4-H Youth Conference Center in Chevy Chase, Maryland. National 4-H Conference delegates have an opportunity to increase knowledge, resources and skills that empower them to make an impact on their community in a meaningful and genuine way. The California 4-H YDP conducts an annual selection process for this conference. This conference is coordinated through the State 4-H Office. 

XI. STATE 4-H FIELD DAYS

California 4-H YDP annually hosts a State Field Day / at UC Davis or other locations. This event provides 4-H youth statewide the opportunity to participate in a variety of competitive events and learning opportunities.

XII. NATIONAL, STATE, MULTI-COUNTY AND COUNTY EVENTS, ACTIVITIES AND COMPETITIONS

  1. Purpose
    For more than a hundred years, 4-H has been dedicated to creating opportunities for youth that broaden skills and aspirations while nurturing the full potential of youth. Many of these opportunities come in the form of 4-H events. 4-H events, viewed as activities of positive youth development programming, are framed as intentional learning experiences. Events must have an educational component, regardless of whether they are competitive or non-competitive.
  2. Event Planning
    All 4-H events should be properly planned and communicated and meet standards of program quality, incorporate current research and technology, and have a risk management plan. 
  3. Proposal of New Events
    1. Any 4-H unit, VMO, group or 4-H YDP staff member may propose to have California 4-H YDP participate in a national competition or host a state/statewide event using the Events-Proposal_for_CA_Participation_in_New_National_Event/Activity/Competition or the Events-Proposal_for_New_State_4-H_YDP_Event/Activity/Competition.
    2. Any 4-H unit, VMO, group or 4-H YDP staff member may propose to host a new county or multi-county 4-H event. The Events - Proposal for New County YDP Event Activity Competition or other form required by the county may be used. 
  4. Sanctioning Process for New Events
    1. All proposed new national or state/statewide events, activities or competitions will follow the Events-Process_for_Sanctioning_National and State 4-H_ Events_Flowchart.
    2. All proposed new county or multi-county events, activities or competitions should follow the local procedure established for the host county. See Policy Resources, Forms & Templates for more information and template process. 
  5. Approval
    1. For national and state/statewide events the Associate Director of 4-H Program and Policy gives approval.
    2. For county and multi-county events the county director or designee where the event is being held gives final approval. 

XIII. 4-H YDP SHOOTING SPORTS

  1. Purpose
    The Shooting Sports Program provides instruction in the safe handling of firearms and archery equipment, develops self-confidence and leadership abilities in 4-H participants and instills an appreciation for conservation and wildlife. See also 4-H Shooting Sports - Policies and Procedures.
  2. Objectives
    The Shooting Sports Program uses the skills and disciplines of shooting to assist young people and their leaders in attaining knowledge and developing essential life skills. The program follows a standardized format, lists program components and identifies clearly intended learning outcomes.
  3. Volunteer Certification Requirements
    1. All Instructors, Trainers and adult volunteers in the Shooting Sports Program must be enrolled as 4-H YDP Shooting Sports adult volunteers in their respective counties, and must be certified by the California 4-H YDP Shooting Sports Advisory Committee in each discipline they teach.
    2. No person may be certified as an Instructor, Trainer or adult volunteer until all of the following requirements are met:
      1. Must be currently enrolled as a 4-H adult volunteer and have completed the adult volunteer orientation and screening process at the local level.
      2. Must be at least 21 years of age.
      3. Must have satisfactorily completed a discipline-specific National or State training session, or possess a current certification from an approved organization (see Table 1 in 4-H Shooting Sports - Policies and Procedures).
      4. Must have no felony convictions.
      5. Must have no convictions for hunting, fishing or firearm related violations in the past five (5) years.
      6. Must have no convictions or other restrictions that would prohibit owning, purchasing, receiving, possessing or having under custody or control any firearm.
      7. Must demonstrate competency in instructing youth in Shooting Sports.
      8. Must have submitted a completed 4-H Shooting Sports - Application for Certification to the California 4-H YDP Shooting Sports Advisory Committee and receive certification approval.
  4. Member Participation Eligibility
    Members can participate in the Shooting Sports Program based on the following:
    1. The California 4-H YDP Shooting Sports Program is open to all members nine (9) years of age or older, by December 31st of the program year. Participation in the muzzle loading discipline requires a minimum of one (1) year of prior participation in another discipline.
    2. Eligibility to use firearms, air guns or archery equipment in the California 4-H YDP Shooting Sports Program is subject to approval of the adult volunteer. Approval is based on the member’s ability to follow instructions and safety rules.
    3. Junior and Teen Leaders are allowed to participate in training and certification workshops along with adults. It is not mandatory for youth to attend a certification workshop to be a Junior or Teen Leader.
    4. At the discretion of the Project Leader, Junior and Teen Leaders may assist in the classroom and/or on the range, in accordance with the "Roles for Teen and Junior Leaders" defined in the curriculum for each discipline.
  5. Acquisition of Firearms, Air Guns/BB Guns, and Paint Ball Guns
    1. Air guns and BB guns used for a 4-H YDP shooting sports activity may be purchased or acquired with the permission of the county director. 4-H certified shooting sports adult volunteers should direct their requests to the county director. See 4-H Shooting Sports - Air Gun Purchase Request Authorization form.
    2. The purchase or acquisition of all other firearms, including paint ball guns by the 4-H YDP VMOs or units is prohibited.
    3. Archery equipment and supplies may be purchased.
  6. Firearms
    1. A “firearm” means any device from which is expelled through a barrel a projectile by the force of any explosion or other form of combustion.
    2. The term BB gun (or air rifle/pistol) means any instrument that expels a metallic projectile, such as a BB or a pellet, through the force of air pressure, CO2 pressure or spring action.
  7. Paintball Guns
    Paintball guns and paintball gun activities are prohibited in the 4-H YDP.
  8. Purchase of Ammunition
    1. Ammunition used for a 4-H YDP shooting sports activity may be purchased or acquired by the county director. When additional ammunition is needed, 4-H certified shooting sports adult volunteers should direct their request to the county director. See 4-H Shooting Sports - Ammunition Purchase Request Authorization form.
    2. If individual participants provide their own ammunition, they must present the ammunition for inspection prior to the start of the event. The ammunition must stay under the supervision of the shooting sports adult volunteer during the course of the event.
  9. Firearms and Ammunition Storage
    1. It is the policy of the shooting sports program that, when not in use, all firearms owned (purchased prior to 2002) by 4-H VMOs and units must be unloaded and stored either in a locked gun safe that meets the standards for gun safes adopted pursuant to section 12088.2 of the California Penal Code, or stored with a properly utilized firearm safety device (FSD) that is on the Department of Justice (DOJ) Roster of Firearm Safety Devices Certified for Sale. See 4-H Shooting Sports - Policies and Procedures.
    2. 4-H VMOs and units that are storing firearms as discussed in the paragraph above must maintain an accurate inventory of all 4-H (or University) owned firearms and report this inventory annually to the county director.

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